In the summer of 2014, Sweet Water Outreach spent two months in Africa. In Kenya we have adopted the Tabaka Ward and its community. Our work in Kenya includes four pilot schools where we spent time teaching the children a basic health and hygiene course and instructing the teachers on how to mix a chlorine solution, provided by Sweet Water, to clean the school’s water. We are working with five small churches and installed two filtration systems. In addition to these projects, Sweet Water has made connections with community leaders, government officials, and several medical institutions in the Tabaka Ward. We ended this year’s trip in Tanzania where we provided several filters and some maintenance to two chlorine generator systems, already installed by Sweet Water. Sweet Water has also begun work with a local ministry in Dar es Salaam, dedicated to ministering to the rural villages in Tanzania. We installed a Chlorine Generator system for them in Dar es Salaam and will continue to work with them, teaching their people our hygiene curriculum and installation options.

This year we have taken twenty-nine water tests – all, except two, tested positive for e.coli bacteria. Our test is specifically designed to test for e.coli bacteria, which is the primary danger in this area. E.coli, from human and animal waste, contaminates the water, and in the best-case scenarios, causes only abdominal pain and diarrhea. In worst-case scenarios, the bacteria can carry serious diseases like typhoid and cholera.  When we talk to the students at the schools, we ask them if they know anyone who has had typhoid and every time, every student raises their hand. Which means, they also, very likely know someone who has died from Typhoid.

Sweet Water has now spent two years working in Kisii, Kenya. Specifically our work has centered in the Tabaka ward of Kisii County. In Tabaka alone, we have discovered five deep bore holes (deep wells) – most likely this water would be clean IF they weren’t ALL broken. There are at least two water plants – both are producing unclean water and at best are sporadic in their production. Driving through Tabaka we have also seen many signs and kiosks where someone started a water project that wasn’t sustained. It’s important to understand these things and learn from them, not to highlight where someone else failed (these people deserve applause for being a part of the solution and we are only able to move forward on their shoulders), but to better understand the obstacles we face and the best way to build a sustainable project.

  


Kisii, Kenya

Churches
Hospitals & Clinics
Schools
Community Planning
Homes

 

Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

Churches
Collaboration with Local Ministry
Homes